Helpful articles for UX job searching: putting yourself in the employers’ shoes

I recently cleaned out my personal bookmarks and wanted to share a few useful ones I came across. I’m very happy with my current position so I wanted to share these before deleting these links. Hopefully these are useful to others.

I think what helped me most in searching for my current position was to put myself in the employers’ shoes. By doing so, I was able to find the most appropriate jobs given my skills, interests, and career aspirations while also keeping in mind the employers’ needs. After all, getting an offer for a job involves both parties, and there must be mutual interest.

The links below fall into two categories. The first one involves the actual job search. The links near the top are most directly applicable to UX jobs, and the further down you go, the more general the advice is. However, I think it is still helpful advice

The second set of links involves deciding if a job is right for you

UX Job search

http://whitneyhess.com/blog/2012/09/17/how-to-evaluate-a-ux-designer-for-your-company-or-what-makes-a-great-user-experience-designer/

http://www.usabilitycounts.com/2011/10/18/how-to-get-started-in-user-experience-seven-tips/

http://www.onwardsearch.com/2012/05/research-yourself-into-a-new-ux-job-2/

http://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/9-things-you-wish-you-could-say-to-job-candidates.html

http://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/3-interview-questions-that-reveal-everything.html?nav=next

http://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/5-questions-great-job-candidates-ask-interviewers.html

Deciding the right job for you

http://www.theladders.com/career-advice/3-steps-to-rate-every-job-offer

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20131007180055-407452-3-proven-ways-to-make-tough-job-decisions?trk=tod-home-art-list-large_0

I’m a huge fan of the link from “theladders.com”. It was extremely helpful in deciding between job offers. Before I came across that link, it was difficult to decide. I was fortunate to have a few options, and they all were very appealing and involved the kind of work I wanted to do. The “RIGHT” framework was helpful and made it obvious there was a clear winner for me, IBM (Pittsburgh)

Whereas the other offers I had involved more of a mix of UX Research and interaction design (40/60), the Pittsburgh office would give me the opportunity to focus on UX Research (which is what I wanted) while still giving me some work in interaction design (80/20). My manager had a research background and was clearly committed to it, having contributed heavily to some of the company’s learning materials involving UX Research. However, she had a balanced team that had a UX Designer, visual designer, and many front-end developers with design skills.

Given the limited number of UX Researchers in some of the other design teams, I would also have the opportunity to help other teams as part of a “User Research SWAT” team. This has been an great experience since it has allowed me to work with other teams, sometimes finding opportunities to collaborate between teams.

The team was very enthusiastic and collaborative, and I liked their personalities. Clearly nice people with a great sense of humor, and also with similar interests as mine outside of work (video games, board games, music)

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